Seminar / Conference

National Conference on Cultural Crossings: Diffusing Borders
The fourth national conference was organized by the Department of English (PG) of Kristu Jayanti College under the title Cultural Crossings: Diffusing Borders. It was the first national conference conducted on a virtual platform and it brought together research scholars and paper presenters from all across India.

Cultural Crossings shatter differences that divide the human race and the conference conducted by the Department of English (PG) called for a dissolution of the borders that separate cultures through discussions bringing together the newfound explorations in Social Sciences and Humanities to arrive at new perspectives that challenge and blur the boundaries that separate communities from one another.

Dr. Krishnaprabha V.P, Head of Department, English (PG) welcomed the Chief Guest, Justice P.S Narayana, author and judge, and the Keynote Speaker, Prof. Joseph Bathanti, Poet Laureate and Award-Winning Author, along with other guests. In the prelude to the conference, Dr. Krisna Prabha V.P elaborated that the aim of the conference is to address the multiplicity of analytical methods in cultural studies.

In the presidential address that followed, Principal Rev. Dr. Augustine George spoke about how respecting the culture of the other has become the need of the hour and emphasized the commitment of the college need to build humanity through an education that inculcates a celebration of the uniqueness of cultures.

The Chief Guest of the Conference, Justice P.S Narayana, Former Judge of High Court of Andhra Pradesh and author of a hundred and eighty books, was introduced by Conference Convenor Dr. Lyola Thomas. The Honorable Justice P.S Narayana spoke about the interrelatedness of culture and ethics. He gave examples from his own experiences with the Indian judiciary and the slender divisions between diverse expressions of culture, tradition, civilization, customs, practices, caste, religion, politics, nationalism, internationalism, regionalism, minority rights, linguistic groups and the like. He asserted the importance of language as a key element in the understanding of culture and the promotion of cultural harmony. There were about 330 participants in the session.

Prof. Stephen I, Conference Convenor, delivered the vote of thanks that marked the end of the inaugural session. The keynote session that followed immediately included the keynote address setting the theme of the conference by Prof. Joseph Bathanti, Poet Laureate, author and professor at Appalachian State University, North Carolina. He narrated the unpopular history and the progressive pedagogy of Black Mountain College that made it the first institution in the Jim Crow south state of North Carolina to admit a student of colour Alma Stone Williams in 1944.

Dr. Rajesh Sharma, Professor and Head, Department of English, Punjab University, Patiala in the plenary session that succeeded gave a brief introduction to cultural studies and Raymond Williams. The factors that affect research conducted in the field of cultural studies was discussed and he shed light on the problems of thin reading and the problems of “presentism”, stating that “cultural studies is paralyzed by the present”.

The paper presentation session conducted on two days was chaired by Dr. Krishna Prabha, Prof. Stephen, Prof. Susan and Dr. Lyola Thomas included presenters from various states, verbalizing perspectives on a range of topics from ethnocentrism, nationalism, new-age learning, aestheticization of culture, coffee movements, Adventist sub-culture, OTT platforms, teacher education, emotion and many more explored from a literary lens.

The conference disseminated unrevealed knowledge about the interrelatedness between culture, education, language and psychology, heightening cultural awareness in the participants, presenters and organizers. The conference thus ended on a very successful and transformative note

Webinar on The Cry of Africa: Postcolonial Bioregionalism in Wole Soyinka’s Plays
Class & No. of Students: 56, 1st and 2nd MA EL.
Date: 15. 09. 2020
Objective: To brief students about the relation between post colonialism and bioregionalism.
Resource Person: Dr. Samuel Rufus, Asst Professor, MCC, Chennai

The Department of English (PG) hosted a webinar on September 15, 2020. The occasion was graced by Dr. Samuel Rufus, Assistant Professor, P G & Research Department of English, Madras Christian College, Chennai. It was held on the online platform of Zoom. with an active number of participants. Dr Rufus’s doctoral dissertation was on Post colonialism and he is a recipient of the University Gold Medal in MA English and Winner of the President Venkataraman Gold Medal for Academic Excellency.

Dr Samuel Rufus started off with the topic “How to approach Wole Soyinka’s ‘Dance of the forest?’ and ‘How to engage better with Wole Soyinka’. He mentions the author Wole Soyinka as a rebel, very-critical and that this can be seen in all his plays. He had given a brief introduction on Bioregional studies and how both Post-Colonialism and Bioregionalism come together in the interdisciplinary approach of Wole Soyinka. A Bioregional study is a pro-active approach. It is an offshoot of eco-critical studies, so it engages with nature like environmental studies does. The specialty about bioregionalism is that it celebrates the region, a bio-region in which the characters are placed. The region, in which we live, has been here for thousands of years. But these places are now ravaged and mutilated, that’s where eco-feminism also comes in. The women are compared to the land. The way in which a woman is destroyed is compared to the ways in which the environment is destroyed. The precious resources of the region are completely robbed. Dr. Rufus quoted Mother Teresa’s words “Instead of cursing the darkness you light a candle. This is the essence behind which bioregional studies are built. The aborigines were all connected with their region, a kind of personal bonding at the level of family. They call the river as brother, sea as mother, mountains as sisters. When the white colonial masters came, they had a binary division, nature v/s humans or nature v/s culture. He stated that nature was completely different in Wole Soyinka’s plays. “The Dance of the Forest” was played in the eve of Independence Day of Nigeria in 1960. He quoted Chinua Achebe’s words that “Unless the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter”.

Dr. Rufus elaborated on the way to approach Wole Soyinka’s “Dance of The Forest” using a bioregional perspective. That is, how nature connects with the individual and how they together weave a society. There was a Q and A session at the end of the lecture, where students asked question to the resource person. He stressed on the cosmic interconnectedness that the post colonial Bioregionalism celebrates. The writer always has a unique voice, it is the societies failure to hear the voice of the writer. He quoted Emerson and stated that “You’ve come into this world, not to be happy, but to be useful.”

Bincy Thomas, student, 2nd MA EL opined, “It was an enlightening session in which Dr. Rufus has explained Bioregionalism as a proactive approach celebrating the region, and she also mentioned that the webinar helped in understanding how bioregionalism and post-colonial studies are related.”


Webinar on Derrida and Deconstruction
A webinar titled “Derrida and Deconstruction” was organised by the Department of English (PG) on May 19, 2020. Dr. Joseph Dorairaj, Dean, School of English and Foreign Languages, Gandhigram Rural Institute, Tamilnadu was the resource person of the day.

Dr. Dorairaj discussed from the Semiotics of Saussure to the Deconstruction of Derrida. He started with A Course in General Linguistics by Saussure and explained the concept of Sign, containing the signifier and the signified, and explained the arbitrary relation between them. He also spoke about the concepts ‘Diacritical and Differential Identity’ and placed ‘Langue and Parole’ on the axis. He referred to the seminar conducted at the John Hopkin’s Humanities Centre in the year 1966 titled “The Language of Criticism and the Sciences of Man” where Derrida presented his paper Structure Sign and Play. The seminar served as the birth place of the deconstructionist Derrida.

Dr. Dorairaj went on to elaborate on the connection between Deconstruction and Post-structuralism. He quoted three scholars – Eagleton, Leitch and Barry and their individual understanding of Deconstruction and Post-structuralism. He explained a fourth view point which sees post-structuralism as an umbrella term which includes Post-colonialism, Post-modernism and Feminism, and deconstruction as its significant feature. He delineated on how Derrida with his theory of Deconstruction attacks the philosophical concept of Metaphysics, Phonocentrism and Logocentrism. He also explained the binary oppositions that exist, especially the binary opposition of speech and writing in which speech is privileged. He quoted thinkers like J. Hillis Miller and Paul de Man from their texts to explain the application of Deconstruction. He concluded the talk by explaining the act of deconstructing.

Prof. Qurshid Begum. R, Additional Dean, St. Joseph's College (Autonomous), Tiruchirappalli shared her experiences “I participated in the webinar on Derrida and Deconstruction. Listening to Dr. Joseph Dorairaj is always a great intellectual experience. I would like to congratulate the Management and the organisers for this meticulously planned and executed academic exercise. Wishing you the best in all your future endeavours!”

There were 500 participants across the country; they not only participated as an audience but also interacted with Dr. Dorairaj with enthusiasm.


National Conference on Portrayals Of Probability
The Third National Conference was organised by the Department of English (PG) Portrayals of Probability on January 16, 2020.

Every idea holds a promise, a probability of thought. But as an idea it is yet a possibility…a mere probability. The conference hoped to set the stage and create a space where artists and academicians can come together to muse on their efforts to portray ‘the real’ and ‘the imaginary’, seeking after that ephemeral and evanescent Imagination, in a confluence of Literature and Art.

In the Prelude to the Conference, Dr. Krishna Prabha V.P., Head, Department of English (PG), elaborated on the topic Portrayals of Probability quoting Plato and Aristotle. She made the gathering aware about the emergence of the concept portrayals of probability which was birthed in the thought of Philip Sidney. She spelt out the ways of portrayals in art. She emphasized the role of poetry as universal truth. She made it clear that according to Aristotle, philosophy and poetry take to the avenues of great heights.

In the presidential address which followed, Fr. Josekutty P. D., our beloved Principal, gave a motivational and inspirational speech to the Department of English (PG) urging them to reach higher levels of achievement through relevant discourses of probability in literature.

The Department of English (PG) was proud to host the first ever Art Exhibition which was an integral part of the conference and was reflecting the very essence of the theme of portrayals of probability. The art gallery displayed 147 varieties of art forms which included digital art work as well. The objective behind the exhibition was to focus on the formal, thematic and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability.

In the keynote address, Prof. Sundar Sarukkai, an erudite scholar and philosopher, spoke about the various traditions of philosophy. One of the fundamental questions he posed on to was “what is really real.” Philosophy can be seen as a background for the deep understanding of the topic. He also elucidated that probability is not a manifestation of what we don’t know.

The first plenary session was addressed by Shri Giridhar Khasnis, an artist and art curator. The resource person presented five artists through short videos and showcased how profound art can be and in a deeper sense subverting reality through art.

In the second plenary session, Dr. Jai Singh, Assistant Professor, Department of Indian and World Literature, EFLU, gave us thoughtful insights and interpretive exegesis on musical renaissance, colonial discourses and orientalism.

Paper presentation which happened in the afternoon sessions saw researchers from different universities speaking on a wide range of topics such as performing arts, folklore, illustrations, art works and other art forms pertaining to probability in the light of literary works.

“The national conference along with the Art Exhibition was an excellent platform to showcase the creative genius of the students. The art exhibition has given the students plethora of knowledge about miscellaneous art works and artists. The scattered glass pieces exhibited in the art gallery showed the ‘portrayals and probability’ of day to day life. It gave all an insight that we must not try to fit in, where we do not belong to, if we try, we will get hurt. Philosophically it taught us that don’t search reality when it doesn’t exist in reality” opined Anisha A, a final year student.

The conference led to spreading the light of awareness, paving a path of motivation and interest in the terrain of portrayals of probability in young minds.


National Conference On Cartographies Of Diaspora And Displacements: Narratives Of Expatriates And Poetics Of Exile
The second National Conference was organised by the Department of English (PG) of Kristu Jayanti College under the title Cartographies of Diaspora and Displacements: Narratives of Expatriates and Poetics of Exile on 18 January 2019. The second edition was truly a step forward from the previous edition’s theme on Colonies and their significant global presence. Cartographies of diaspora is an important phenomenon that galvanises the interests of many social sciences, simultaneously. That the Department of English is hosting a conference on the theme is reflective of its role as a facilitator of globally pertinent discourses. Ms. Susan Sanny, Conference Convener, welcomed the Chief Guest Ms. Andaleeb Wajid, author, and the Keynote Speaker Dr. Etienne Rassendran, Professor, St. Joseph’s College, Bangalore, along with other guests. In the presidential address which followed, Principal Fr. Josekutty P. D. spoke about the importance of diaspora communities, their contributions to society and the need for good lessons of living purpose-driven lives to be imitated and appreciated. In the Prelude to the Conference, Dr. Krishna Prabha V. P., HoD, Department of English (PG), described different types of displacements and their importance in the political and socio-economic scene in the world today. She spelt out the agenda for the conference that it might create an awareness among scholars of the plights, capacities and dreams of the exiles, expatriates, refugees and the numerous diaspora.

The Chief Guest of the day, Ms. Andaleeb Wajid, the eminent author of eighteen novels based in Bangalore, spoke about her personal experience – of having had to define and explain her identity often because of being born in one place with which she still maintained familial and social connections but brought up and educated in another. The inaugural session ended with the Dr Arpita Ghosh thanking everyone for their valuable presence. In the keynote address, which was also the first technical session, Dr. Etienne Rassendran, Professor at St. Joseph’s College, Bangalore spoke about the need of demystifying the way in which diaspora is viewed; he spoke of diaspora population as fugitives, characterised by a loss and a longing. He equally underlined the idea of intersectionality of departure and arrival in the life of diaspora communities.

Panel discussion was a fruitful time of live interaction for the audience with the expert panellists. Constituted by Jennifer Sait, Dr K Paul Newman and Dr Mukunda Rao, the panel brought to the conference expatriate experiences, refugee issues and a plethora of narratives on diaspora. Each of the panellists had their own wealth of personal experiences to share with the audience.Paper presentation which happened in the morning and afternoon sessions saw presenters from seven universities and six states speaking on a wide range of topics pertaining to displacement, exile and migration in the light of literary works. The conference led to spreading the light of awareness, paving a path of motivation and interest in the terrain of diasporic experiences in young minds and old.

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON REFLECTIONS AND REFRACTIONS ON (DIS) ABILITY- INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES
A two day International Conference was hosted by the post-graduate departments of the deanery of Humanities, namely English Literature, Psychology, Social Work and Journalism and Mass Communication. People with disabilities have been a neglected community and the most rational solutions to their problems can be brought about only through a multi-disciplinary approach. Dr. S. K. Prasad in his inaugural address gave valuable insights into the legal support the Indian Government has framed to support persons with disabilities. Keynote speaker Dr. Malavika stressed on how the nature of the child is usually misunderstood and that there should be a paradigm shift to a democratic learning environment that uses inclusivity. The first plenary session led by Prof. Thomas Abraham discussed how the mainstream media portrays persons with disabilities as either heroes or mere objects of sympathy. Dr. Roopesh in his second plenary session discussed at length the various disabilities, its characteristics and how it can be treated. Dr. Benny spoke about how inclusive education can bring about a change and illustrated speech with practical examples from his life as a counselor.

Day 2 of the conference started off with the fourth plenary session in which Dr. Lovelina discussed the various approaches that a social worker should undertake while dealing with the disabled people. The fifth and the last plenary session led by Prof. Shiva Rama Krishna who spoke about super-consciousness that can lead them through difficult times. The most vital aspect of the second day was the paper presentations that took place at three venues simultaneously. A wide range of topics were covered under different disciplines and saw active participation from the students of English Department as well. A panel discussion was also held, in which various aspects like technological aids for the disabled was discussed. Two students also shared their personal story towards success despite health and fate failing them. Two days brimming with knowledge came to an end with the valedictory in which Dr. A Radhakrishnan Nair appreciated the collective effort of the four departments in throwing light upon a topic which is very relevant in today’s world. The biggest take away for the students from the conference was the realization that the actual disability lies in the attitude of the society.


National Conference On Cartographies Of Diaspora And Displacements: Narratives Of Expatriates And Poetics Of Exile
The second National Conference was organised by the Department of English (PG) of Kristu Jayanti College under the title Cartographies of Diaspora and Displacements: Narratives of Expatriates and Poetics of Exile on 18 January 2019. The second edition was truly a step forward from the previous edition’s theme on Colonies and their significant global presence. Cartographies of diaspora is an important phenomenon that galvanises the interests of many social sciences, simultaneously. That the Department of English is hosting a conference on the theme is reflective of its role as a facilitator of globally pertinent discourses. Ms. Susan Sanny, Conference Convener, welcomed the Chief Guest Ms. Andaleeb Wajid, author, and the Keynote Speaker Dr. Etienne Rassendran, Professor, St. Joseph’s College, Bangalore, along with other guests. In the presidential address which followed, Principal Fr. Josekutty P. D. spoke about the importance of diaspora communities, their contributions to society and the need for good lessons of living purpose-driven lives to be imitated and appreciated. In the Prelude to the Conference, Dr. Krishna Prabha V. P., HoD, Department of English (PG), described different types of displacements and their importance in the political and socio-economic scene in the world today. She spelt out the agenda for the conference that it might create an awareness among scholars of the plights, capacities and dreams of the exiles, expatriates, refugees and the numerous diaspora.

The Chief Guest of the day, Ms. Andaleeb Wajid, the eminent author of eighteen novels based in Bangalore, spoke about her personal experience – of having had to define and explain her identity often because of being born in one place with which she still maintained familial and social connections but brought up and educated in another. The inaugural session ended with the Dr Arpita Ghosh thanking everyone for their valuable presence. In the keynote address, which was also the first technical session, Dr. Etienne Rassendran, Professor at St. Joseph’s College, Bangalore spoke about the need of demystifying the way in which diaspora is viewed; he spoke of diaspora population as fugitives, characterised by a loss and a longing. He equally underlined the idea of intersectionality of departure and arrival in the life of diaspora communities.

Panel discussion was a fruitful time of live interaction for the audience with the expert panellists. Constituted by Jennifer Sait, Dr K Paul Newman and Dr Mukunda Rao, the panel brought to the conference expatriate experiences, refugee issues and a plethora of narratives on diaspora. Each of the panellists had their own wealth of personal experiences to share with the audience.Paper presentation which happened in the morning and afternoon sessions saw presenters from seven universities and six states speaking on a wide range of topics pertaining to displacement, exile and migration in the light of literary works. The conference led to spreading the light of awareness, paving a path of motivation and interest in the terrain of diasporic experiences in young minds and old.

National Conference
With an aim to look into the richness and diversity of aboriginal and regional literatures produced during the post-colonial period, the first National Conference was organized by the post graduate department of English Literature on 23 January 2018 in the Amphitheatre, at Kristu Jayanti College. The chief guests, Ms. Shinie Antony and Ms. Meena T. Pillai were cordially welcomed by the conference convener Ms. Susan Sanny. There were participants from various institutions and universities across Bangalore and the audience was a rich heterogeneous mixture of the Jayantians. The Head of the English Department PG, Dr. Krishnaprabha painted a collage in the prelude to the conference. Her dissertation included a detailed explanation of what Aboriginal Literature actually meant. She traced the various aboriginal Literatures that included the African Literature. The prelude also kindled various questions regarding colonialism and post-colonialism. The conference was conducted successfully with a lot of interactive sessions that benefitted all those who were present.

Result of the Build your Micro Terrarium competition [CLICK HERE FOR RESULTS] | Download the ( Kristu Jayanti + ) App for easy access and to keep yourselves updated with the latest news & activities on the campus. Download from Google Play store (android devices) and app store (Apple devices).|
© 2021 Kristu Jayanti College (Autonomous) K. Narayanapura, Kothanur (PO) Bengaluru 560077, Karnataka.